Losing Happiness: 407 Days of Misery for Sens Fans

Erik Karlsson

It took 407 days to completely destroy a fan-base’s optimism and happiness. Here I am writing about something, the Ottawa Senators, something which for nearly my entire life had brought me joy. Accordingly, you would think I would be excited to write about the Sens, but honestly lately I have wanted to avoid them in my writing. I am writing about the implosion of a franchise, and all it took was 407 days. The Erik Karlsson trade saga is the final nail in the coffin.

Let’s just look at the Senators starting lineup for Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Finals:

Bobby Ryan – Kyle Turris (traded) – Mark Stone

Mike Hoffman (traded) – Jean-Gabriel Pageau – Tom Pyatt

Clarke MacArthur (retired) – Derick Brassard (traded) – Zack Smith

Viktor Stalberg (Europe) – Chris Kelly (free agency) – Ryan Dzingel

Marc Methot (traded) – Erik Karlsson (basically traded)

Dion Phaneuf (traded) – Cody Ceci

Fredrik Claesson (free agency) – Chris Wideman

Craig Anderson (Requested trade)

Mike Condon

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9 of 20 of those players are no longer in a Sens jersey, Karlsson is bound to join them and Anderson has requested to leave Ottawa. To say it is not going well, is putting it in kind terms. This has been a disaster, and the roster and hockey team sucking is just the tip of the iceberg. Eugene Melnyk has bashed, belittled and ignored his once loyal fan-base, who have been left hurt and betrayed. Melnyk’s attempts to fix the problems that exist in this organization have been feeble and poorly executed.

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His apologies have hardly been apologies, the town hall meetings were met with lukewarm and mixed reactions and the LeBreton Flats development has been stalled. This after Mr. Melnyk had proudly addressed the situation on January 25thAccording to Ottawa Mayor, Jim Watson the hold-up is entirely on Melnyk. Melnyk has no plan, no money, and no guidance. He has liquidated half of last year’s roster, yet does not understand how the team has gone downhill so quickly. He has to “refinance” to pay off debt he owes. Finally, the CEO (Tom Anselmi) he brought into help speed up the LeBreton Flats development and rebuild the Senators brand has already left. In just over a year Anselmi, the man who oversaw the construction of the Air Canada Centre and was formerly the COO with MLSE, left. He wanted nothing to do with this tire fire. You cannot blame Anselmi, who was tired of working with Melnyk and an organization with zero direction. This has been the most painful year of my life as a Sens fan, and I think you would be hard pressed to find a Sens fan who disagrees. How can something so beautiful and heart-warming like the 2016-17 Senators team, be obliterated and tarnished so quickly?

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Blame whoever you want to blame, but you will not move me from my stance. Eugene Melnyk is the problem here. Not Pierre Dorion, not Guy Boucher and certainly not the players. Melnyk is the tyrant who put these people in their positions, and he is the same man who oversaw the destruction of this franchise. Instead of attempting to stop the bleeding, he has increased it and stepped on our hearts. To threaten relocation, because fans are displeased with the team performance, arena location, and management decisions is probably one of the worst courses of action. Yet, he did it confidently and with zero remorse in his words. I think those comments on December 16th, speak volumes about Melnyk’s outlook on this franchise. On arguably the biggest weekend of the franchise’s history, as Ottawa was set to proudly host the NHL 100 Winter Classic, Mr. Melnyk decided he needed the spotlight and to steal the show. He is selfish and does not care about the fans, and he has burned almost every single bridge the Senators organization has made.

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I wish I could say the Ottawa Senators could make me happy right now, but unless Erik Karlsson miraculously ends up staying, or Eugene Melnyk sells the franchise, I believe I will be left saddened by the Sens until at least the end of this summer. I will never stop cheering for this franchise so long as they exist, because of the disease that is sport fandom, but you can be assured I am gripping my wallet much tighter. I plan to do all in my power to avoid giving Melnyk another dime of my hard earned money until our Ottawa Senators are run properly. And yes, I said our, because us the fans have invested hundreds, even thousands into this franchise year over year, and we deserve better than this. Here’s hoping in 407 days, Eugene Melnyk will simply be a name in history, rather than the source of our endless nightmare for Sens fans.

Thank you for reading and Go Sens Go.

#MelnykOut

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Diamond In The Rough: Mark Stone’s Emergence As A Leader     

Diamond In The Rough: Mark Stone’s Emergence As A Leader

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On July 8, 2009, the Ottawa Senators traded Alex Auld to the Dallas Stars for their 6th round draft pick in the 2010 NHL Entry Draft. The trade would become a memorable one for Sens fans. With the pick, the team selected Mark Stone from the Brandon Wheat Kings of the Western Hockey League. Once projected to be a Top-50 pick, the forward’s injuries and below-average skating ability hampered his draft stock.

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After being drafted, Stone would score 229 points in 137 games for the Brandon Wheat Kings, and, in 2012, would give Senator fans a glimpse into their future. The Senators chose to recall Stone for a pivotal 1st round Game 5 match-up vs the New York Rangers at Madison Square Garden. Stone played a meager 8:43, but showed his offensive capability by recording 3:35 in power-play time and recording the primary assist on Jason Spezza’s game-winning goal.

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It was not until the 2014-15 season, though, that Stone secured an opening night roster spot. Since then, Stone has become a treat to watch due to his offensive abilities. In his first 226 games, Stone tallied 179 points and 339 takeaways, over 100 more than any other player in the NHL. Stone is a masterful two-way forward, able to pick opponents’ pockets and turn takeaways into offensive opportunities.

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Outside of Ottawa, many fans have overlooked Mark Stone. He was left off of TSN’s list of the top 50 players for the 2017-18 season, and his projected goal total was just over 20. Stone has exploded this season: in 43 games, he has 18 goals and 42 points. In a year where the Senators have struggled, Stone has been an offensive mainstay. Stone has used his quick hands in tight to fill the net this season.

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Stone has not lost sight of the main goal; to win hockey games. In December, frustrated with his team’s play after another blowout loss, Stone called out the locker room, This has not been the only time Stone has been the loudest voice among his peers. A no non-sense approach, accompanied by blunt and critical statements, has made Stone a leader on and off the ice. This approach has grabbed the attention of the Senators organization and management.

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Shortly after these comments, the Senators asked their players for their no-trade lists, signalling that change could be on the way. For a period of time, the entire Senators organization was being openly scrutinized. Then, Pierre Dorion and the Senators made their best decision of the season. While Dorion did indicate the Senators were ready to make roster moves, they also made it clear that Erik Karlsson and Mark Stone were untouchable. The once-6th round pick was not only having a spectacular season, but his value was deemed so important that the Senators found him unmovable. Once a diamond in the rough, Mark Stone is now one of the few positives found on an underachieving hockey team as they have hit the mid-point of their season.

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The Senators are in rough shape, and no bye week could hide that. But, this team and organization has a knack for stringing together wins in the second half of their season. It would be surprising to see them tank, and there is no way Stone will stop playing hard. As many may remember, the “Hamburglar” run of 2015 was the Andrew Hammond story. Yet, this was the beginning of Stone’s coming out party. In his last 27 games of 2014-15, Stone recorded 31 points, and finished the season on a 9-game point streak. If the Senators are going to have any hope of making the playoffs, they will need this sort of production from Stone. A tall task, but it would be a shock if he did not provide it.

Duchene To The Sens: What Does It Mean?

Duchene To The Sens: What Does It Mean?

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Matt Duchene’s name was in trade rumours for nearly 2 years, and for the majority of that time his name was connected to Ottawa. After multiple failed attempts, Pierre Dorion’s persistence paid off, and on Sunday evening, the Senators finally got Matt Duchene. With the trade finally made, it comes time to break it down and analyze what all of this means.

The official deal:

Sens Receive: Matt Duchene from COL

Predators Receive: Kyle Turris from OTT, sign him to a 6-year $36M deal

Avs Receive: Shane Bowers, Andrew Hammond, 2018 1st round pick & 2019 3rd round pick from OTT, and receive Samuel Girard, Vladislav Kamenev and 2018 2nd round pick

In Duchene, the Sens gain an Olympic gold medallist who has hit 70 points in a season and is only 26 years old. Furthermore, he has a year remaining on his contract after this season, which buys the Senators time to sort out their salary cap situation. Duchene also brings more speed, and will arguably produce even more with the talent provided in Ottawa, like Mike Hoffman. Guy Boucher has talked a lot about “playing fast” and how Ottawa is best when doing so. Playing fast in Boucher’s mind is breaking out quickly, transitioning quickly and doing everything with speed. Duchene exemplifies this with his quick feet and stick. Here, Duchene goes the length of the ice in 7 seconds or less. He starts off with a quick breakout, transitions into an offensive opportunity, and finishes with a goal. This explosive speed is exactly what the Senators needed to add to their Top 6.

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To acquire Duchene, the Senators had to part with a Top 6 forward, losing Kyle Turris.  Contract talks between Turris and the Senators had broken down recently, though. The Sens were put in a position where they had to sign Turris in a short timeframe, or he would walk away during free agency. Yes, they gave up Turris, but his replacement is arguably the better player. As well, Turris immediately signed a 6-year $36M deal in Nashville, which means he will make $6M per year until he is 35. With this, the Sens likely dodged a bullet there. While $6M seems reasonable for Nashville, it would not have been on the table for Ottawa. If Turris accepted that contract with Ottawa, he would make approximately $2.8M after taxes; in Nashville, $3.6M. That is a huge, underlying factor, which likely made Nashville much more attractive at $6M a year. Dealing Andrew Hammond gives some cap relief, as his time was clearly up with Condon firmly secured as the back-up. Shane Bowers may have been a first-round pick, but the Senators prospect pool is incredibly deep at the moment, and they did not have to give up Logan Brown, Colin White or Thomas Chabot. The picks are fine to go, because the Sens are pushing right now and do not need to stock up on young talent. They want to win; this trade solidifies that notion.

With the Senators indicating that they want to win, let us look at what their current lineup, when healthy, looks like:

Forwards:

Bobby Ryan – Derrick Brassard – Mark Stone

Mike Hoffman – Matt Duchene – Ryan Dzingel

Tom Pyatt – Jean-Gabriel Pageau – Chris DiDomenico

Zack Smith – Nate Thompson – Alexandre Burrows

Additional Talent: Colin White & Filip Chlapik

Defensemen:

Johnny Oduya – Erik Karlsson

Dion Phaneuf – Cody Ceci

Freddy Claesson – Chris Wideman

Additional Talent: Thomas Chabot, Ben Harpur and Christian Jaros

Goalies:

Craig Anderson

Mike Condon

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If Thomas Chabot can make his way onto the Senators roster and replace Johnny Oduya, the Senators’ Top-6 defensemen would be battle-tested and ready to go. As for the forwards, moving Zack Smith could make the team better now and secure your future. Colin White will be coming off of IR soon, and is good enough to play in the NHL right now. His development could take a huge step forward this year. Smith has been somewhat underwhelming, and has a hefty cap hit of $3.25M, with 3 years left after the 17-18 season. If the Senators were to move him, they would not only free up a spot in the lineup for White, but would free-up cap space for July 1st, 2018. This is when Matt Duchene, Mark Stone, and Erik Karlsson all become available to sign extensions.

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The Senators’ salaries currently total $71.291M, with the cap at $75M. If Smith is moved, and White takes his spot $2.325M of cap space is freed up. Assuming Clarke MacArthur is eventually either placed on long-termed injured reserve or has his contract traded, this would free up an additional $4.65M, leaving the Senators with a $64.316M cap hit. If Karlsson is signed for $10.5M, Stone for $6.5M, and Duchene for $6.5M, this would put the Senators at a cap hit of $64.044M going into the 2019-20 season, where the cap would likely be over $75M. Even if Karlsson, Stone and Duchene, each wanted an extra million, there arguably could be space for that. Going into 19-20 they would have the following twelve players signed:

FWDs: Bobby Ryan, Mark Stone, JG Pageau, Matt Duchene, Mike Hoffman, Logan Brown

D: Dion Phaneuf, Mark Borowiecki, Erik Karlsson, Thomas Chabot

G: Craig Anderson, Mike Condon

10 current prospects who could be ready by 2019-20: Christian Jaros (D) (Age: 21), Filip Chlapik (F) (Age: 20), Drake Batherson (F) (Age: 19), Alex Formenton (F) (Age: 18), Max Lajoie (D) (Age: 20), Ben Harpur (D) (Age: 22), Christian Wolanin (D) (Age: 22), Marcus Hogberg (G) (Age: 22), Francis Perron (F) (Age: 21), Nick Paul (F) (Age: 22).

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And these moves would leave money for their young talent exiting their entry-level contracts (Colin White, Freddy Claesson and Cody Ceci). Furthermore, some of the young talent like Christian Jaros, Filip Chlapik, and Drake Batherson could very well be on the Sens roster by then, and could still be one Entry-Level Contracts, keeping costs down. If that is the case, they would have no problem being competitive and under the cap. The numbers don’t lie, and the math spells that these moves can secure the Senators’ future and keep them at an extremely competitive level.

 

Matt Duchene’s move to the Senators is a calculated risk, but a worthwhile one, especially considering his apparent want to play in Ottawa. This move is a step forward for the Senators, but it should not be the only one. They should consider empowering their young talent by moving older parts. Guy Boucher talked about “playing fast”, and these young players are incredibly quick and will only learn how to play Boucher’s style with more time on the ice. The Ottawa Senators are extremely close to replicating their Eastern-Conference Final run, and putting together a roster that can compete for years to come. It is a good time to be an Ottawa Senators fan.

Just My Thoughts: The World of Sports (Apr. 12-26)

The Road to Redemption

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Every spring Canadians become captivated by hockey and the Stanley Cup Playoffs. Players will sacrifice it all to help their teams inch closer to a Cup win. Consider Gregory Campbell who played through a broken leg in 2013 with the Boston Bruins. However, some players have their playoff dreams ripped away from them be it due to injury or even off-ice issues. Zack Kassian became an overnight sensation, after scoring two crucial game-winning goals for the Edmonton Oilers in the first round. On the other side of Canada, Clarke MacArthur launched Ottawa into a frenzy when he scored the overtime-winner in Game 6 of the Senators’ first round series to send the Sens to round two. Both players endured a lot of pain, stress, and doubt; but, they are finally breaking through.

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On October 4, 2015, Zack Kassian found himself in troubled waters. The Windsor native had not played a single game for the Montreal Canadiens, when he was involved in a car accident that day, suffering a broken nose and fractured left foot. Kassian was found to be under the influence of alcohol, at the time of the accident, though he was not the driver. However, this revelation saw him placed into the NHL’s substance abuse program. The once highly-touted prospect had hit rock-bottom. Traded three times and considered a bust, Kassian needed help and was forced to get it. After finishing his stint in the NHL’s substance abuse program Kassian was told not to report to the St. John Ice Caps (the Canadiens’ affiliate) and was traded to the Edmonton Oilers.

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As if it was not hard enough for Kassian to join the fourth team of his NHL career at the age of 24, Kassian was joining a team that hated his guts. During a pre-season game in 2013 Kassian blatantly high-sticked then-Oiler Sam Gagner in the face, resulting in Gagner losing four teeth and needing a plate and six screws to repair his mouth. To make his own matters worse, when Gagner returned in a game against Vancouver later that season, Kassian decided to taunt him for having to wear a face-shield as result of the injury. Kassian became public enemy number one in Edmonton. Yet, Oilers General Manager Peter Chiarelli saw untapped potential and a low-risk opportunity in Kassian, and gave him a final chance to prove himself. It was not an easy road for Kassian; but, this was the best offer he was going to receive, and he wanted to make the best of the opportunity.

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After a short stint with the Bakersfield Condors in the AHL, Kassian got the call from Edmonton to return to the NHL, and made his debut with the Oilers on January 14, 2016. Just under a week later, he scored his first NHL goal in over 10 months. Since then, Kassian has found a consistent role in the Oilers’ lineup. The 26-year old played a career-high 79 games this season and recorded 24 points, while providing valuable minutes on the team’s penalty kill. Though, nothing can be as sweet as Kassian’s playoff production, which has truly been a coming out party for him on a national stage. The gritty Kassian cashed in on a breakaway opportunity in Game 2 shorthanded and sent Edmonton into pandemonium. The Oilers would go onto win the game, and even up the series, however, Kassian’s heroics were not done there. In Game 3, a David Schlemko was gifted to Kassian who deposited the game’s only goal into the Sharks net, winning the game for Edmonton in doing so. This lea TSN’s Ryan Rishaug and Darren Dreger to question whether Kassian is on his way to becoming a playoff-star, when commenting on his breakout performance. Whether he is on his way to becoming a playoff star or not, one thing is for sure, Kassian is in a much better place than he was a year and a half ago, and is a better man for it.

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On the other side of Canada, a different story has been unfolding over the past two years. On February 16, 2015, in a game between the Ottawa Senators and Carolina Hurricanes, Clarke MacArthur found his team falling victim to an odd-man rush. Seeing this, MacArthur sped up to pick up his man going to the net. In doing so, though, MacArthur fell and goaltender Robin Lehner gave him an inadvertent blocker to the head. This was MacArthur’s first concussion, and, not thinking much of it, he made a goal to return to the Senators lineup later that season. MacArthur was a part of the Senators’ “Hamburglar” run, even stringing together a seven-game point streak to end the regular season. However, MacArthur’s return may have cost him. The Senators had high aspirations for MacArthur coming into the 2015-16 season, but only four games in, he suffered another concussion. General Manager Bryan Murray announced a week later that MacArthur would not be returning in the near future.

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In late March of 2016, MacArthur finally passed baseline tests to return. But, with the team far from playoff contention, the Senators shut him down for the season. With that in mind, fans were excited to see MacArthur skating with the Senators in September, and were ambitious and anxious to see the top-six forward back on the ice. On September 25, disaster struck. In a team scrimmage newly-acquired Senator Patrick Sieloff gave MacArthur a hard body check along the boards, and MacArthur instantly collapsed. Furious with the situation teammates Bobby Ryan and Chris Neil began to fight Sieloff. MacArthur was aided off the ice by teammates, and a happy day turned somber in the blink of an eye.

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With another setback MacArthur was told to take his time, and to consult concussion doctors about his future. Amazingly enough, by late October, MacArthur was back around the rink. Senators’ Head Coach Guy Boucher informed the media that MacArthur would be travelling with the team, as he thought it would be good for him to be around his teammates. In early December, fans received promising news when MacArthur indicated he intended to join the Senators sometime in January. This news came as a surprise to many, as MacArthur had now suffered three concussions in less than two years. Training every day, and practising with his teammates in a non-contact jersey, MacArthur would stay on the ice after his teammates left, working as hard as he could to get back. On January 20, 2017, the final nail in the coffin appeared to have been put in. Senators General Manager Pierre Dorion announced that doctors had advised the team to shut MacArthur down for the year, and that they intended to do so. Dorion also refused to comment on MacArthur’s future. It seemed to be the end to an incredible comeback, and MacArthur was crushed. Yet, he refused to give up.

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In late-March, the unexpected happened. MacArthur announced that he was not shut down and still intended to play. Boucher and Dorion, not in complete agreement with the comments, gave rather cautious responses to this. Then, on April 4th, Dorion shocked the hockey world by announcing that MacArthur would be in the lineup that evening for the Senators game against the Detroit Red Wings. The hockey community instantly became embroiled in a heated discussion, on whether MacArthur should be playing or not. However, when he hit the ice for his first professional game in nearly two years the building roared in excitement for #16. At the end of the night, the Senators and MacArthur had won, proving he could still play. He was noticeably emotional during his post-game interview, but set his eyes towards the playoffs, focused and determined to be ready if he got the call. And, he got the call. As described by Boucher, “all of Ottawa raised its arms when MacArthur scored in Game 2”. Then all of Ottawa celebrated again when MacArthur scored the series-winning goal in Game 6 to defeat the Boston Bruins.

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Two very different journeys by two men in different points of their careers. One unproven and undesired, and one injured and distraught. However, they both persevered and overcame their battles. Canada tunes into the Stanley Cup Playoffs and cheer for these men, commending them for their acts of courage and strength. Both Kassian and MacArthur serve as reminders to never ever give up on your dreams. No matter who is against you, you can always achieve those dreams if you work hard enough to get there. Congratulations Zack and Clarke, your dreams have come true, and it is wonderful to have you guys back on the ice.

 

Note to my readers: Sorry I could not provide you with the tidbits this week! As I was in exam period and have been quite busy! I hope you enjoyed this week’s piece, though, and hope you stick along for the ride in the summer! Enjoy the playoffs! And all should return to normal this coming week, my Facebook and Twitter will give updates if that changes! Thank you for your support as always!

Special thanks to Geoff Marlowe for helping with the editing work and a big thank you to you the reader for taking your time to read my work! Appreciate it! Hope you continue to read along, if you have any suggestions/comments/questions, please feel free to inbox me or talk to me on Twitter @sassysaslove.

Just My Thoughts: The World of Sports (Apr. 6-11)

Rediscovering Love for the Ottawa Senators: A Fan’s Journey from 2013-2017

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Coming into this season the Ottawa Senators had made the playoffs one time in their past three seasons. Dating back to the 2007-08 season the Senators had won one playoff series. They were a team who never seemed amongst the league’s best: even their unprecedented Hamburglar run in 2014-15 ended after six playoff games. Inconsistency, poor structure, and a lack of talent contributed to the Senators’ mediocrity. Through and through I followed the team, but there has been something missing in these past years. My life-long fandom of the Sens changed when this organization betrayed my trust and made me have mixed feelings about it on July 5th of 2013.

 

I had heard speculation that Daniel Alfredsson was looking at all offers, but I never believed he would leave the Senators. Then, around noon, news broke that Alfredsson would be leaving Senators to sign with the Detroit Red Wings. Originally I thought Alfredsson just wanted a Stanley Cup, but quickly I found out there was more to that.

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Reports had originally surfaced that Alfredsson was handed a blank check. Then, this tweet appeared.  Alfredsson had his previous contract front-loaded, and had a salary of $1M in the 2012-13 season. This was done with the intention of Alfredsson not playing in 2012-13, as both the Senators and Alfie believed he would retire. However, that was not the case, and this side deal to keep the Senators’ cap down came under scrutiny. Having done the Senators a favour Alfredsson expected to be rewarded with his desired salary of $5.5M. Instead, he was asked to take another hometown discount. The Senators never believed he would leave, but the contract debacle forced Alfredsson out of Ottawa. I did not feel betrayed by Alfredsson, but by management, and more importantly ownership. Eugene Melnyk failed to reward Alfie for seventeen years of elite play and commitment to the city. That day marked the end of a chapter in Ottawa.

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The Senators attempted to fill Alfredsson’s void by acquiring a new franchise winger. Bobby Ryan, was acquired from the Anaheim Ducks for Jakob Silfverberg, Stefan Noesen and a first round-pick (Nick Ritchie). Originally, the move was met with excitement, and was hoped to keep the fan-base happy despite losing Alfie. However, it has not worked out as hoped. Ryan was originally thought to be a perfect pairing with Jason Spezza, but the two did not gel together. Since then, Ryan has been under scrutiny for his lack of production. Up until this season, Ryan had performed respectably, recording multiple 50 point seasons and a couple of 20 goal years for Ottawa. However, he did not turn into the player they hoped for. The Ryan trade was rushed by Ottawa, as the Sens gave up a lot for what was seen to be a franchise winger. Now Sens fans remain bitter about the trade and wish it never happened.

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Shortly after Ryan arrived, Jason Spezza was selected as captain of the Ottawa Senators when Alfredsson left town and became the scapegoat for everything. Spezza tried his best to help guide a team with a lack of talent, but without talent to compliment him other than Erik Karlsson it was futile. Despite putting up 66 points in 75 games, Spezza struggled in the defensive zone, and blame was directed his way. Being the successor to Alfredsson was no easy task and it wore on Spezza, and after his first season as Senators’ captain he requested a trade. Spezza’s era as captain was short, sad and forgettable; though, it did mark a signal of change.

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Spezza departure left the captaincy open, and the Ottawa Senators quickly announced that Erik Karlsson would take over. With this, the youth movement of the Sens took charge. Karlsson, aided by Kyle Turris, Mark Stone, and Mike Hoffman, brought exciting play to a team desperate for energy. But, management managed to kill some of that joy. After rallying from a three-goal deficit to win in overtime win over the Vancouver Canucks, the Senators fired Head Coach Paul MacLean. The firing seemed odd to many, given that MacLean had been a Jack Adams Trophy winner and that the Sens core was still young and developing. Reports began to surface that the move was not done by General Manager Bryan Murray, but by owner Eugene Melnyk. Once again, Melnyk had his hand in hockey decisions. Because, MacLean’s views did not align with Melnyk’s a great coach was fired.

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MacLean was succeed by a less than dazzling one. Dave Cameron got Ottawa to the playoffs on the back of Andrew Hammond, but his systems were not solid and he was doomed to fail. His eye for talent was lacking, as Hoffman spent the end of 2015-16 in the bottom six despite being the team’s leading goal scorer, while players like Alex Chiasson and Jared Cowen wandered the ice. The Sens had little direction with Cameron. It seemed as though the Senators were just riding the roller-coaster of mediocrity. Then, a miracle happened.

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Dion Phaneuf trade rumours were circulating. It was thought by many he would be on his way to Detroit, but then something crazy happened. The Phaneuf to Ottawa trade news broke. A smile and sense of excitement overcame me, I was elated. The Senators had rid themselves of underperforming players and received a leader, who other than a large contract was a perfect fit in the Senators top 4. This day I finally had some faith in management and ownership, as they made an excellent move. Which preceded more moves in the off-season.

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After missing the 2016 Stanley Cup Playoffs Dave Cameron was fired, Pierre Dorion took over as GM of the Sens, and Eugene Melnyk challenged his players. It was time for change in the Senators organization, and change has followed. A new head coach brought structure and a new eye for talent to a team in dire need of it; a new general manager was brought in who was not afraid to make bold moves. Change has brought the Senators back to the playoffs, and sees them with home-ice advantage for the first time since 2007. This is also the first time since 2007 that I can confidently say this is a good hockey team. But most importantly, for the first time since Alfie left, I truly love this team. A season that has seen me cry, cheer, and sit on the edge of my seat is going to be capped off with a Senators playoff run, one that I believe will go more than one round. This season, I spent nights up writing, studying, and contemplating the Senators and their tactics, and I love it all. I am enthralled by this team, and am beyond excited for Wednesday’s clash with the Boston Bruins. With all that said, if you, like me felt betrayed when Alfie was cast away from the organization, please give this team a chance; I promise, they will not disappoint you. The Ottawa Senators are back, and they have some good times ahead.

 

Note to my readers: Sorry I could not provide you with the tidbits this week! Same will be the case of next week, as I am in exam period and am quite busy! I hope you enjoyed this week’s piece, though, and hope you stick along for the ride in the summer! Enjoy the playoffs!

Special thanks to Geoff Marlowe for helping with the editing work and a big thank you to you the reader for taking your time to read my work! Appreciate it! Hope you continue to read along, if you have any suggestions/comments/questions, please feel free to inbox me or talk to me on Twitter @sassysaslove.

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